Audio | Homage to Max Mueller: cultural programmes & seminar

A radio programme by Christoph Hahn with German introductions and explanations © 2000 Bayerischer Rundfunk

Excerpts from live programmes and report (click Download >View to listen/read)

Sruti Magazine (India’s premier music and dance magazine, PDF 560 KB):

Excerpt

1974 stamp of India © Wikipedia

Max Mueller Bhavan (German Cultural Institute) in Chennai organised a clutch of cultural programmes and a seminar during 28-30 November 2000 to mark the death centenary of Max Mueller, a great Indologist. Born in 1823, Mueller died when he was 77.

Mueller is remembered for stimulating widespread interest in Indology, mythology, philosophy, comparative religion, linguistics and social criticism. The special cultural relations between India and Germany are largely attributed to his works.

Mueller never visited India. But, had he come to India, he would likely have sought the company of musicians and scholars in the field of the performing arts, considering that he wanted to become a musician and belonged to a family that considered music and poetry a way of life. His first love was indeed music which he would have taken up as a profession but for the unfavourable climate for such a pursuit in his days.

The famous Indologist is best known all over the world for the publication of the Sacred Books of the East (51 volumes), amongst several other works. He was an ardent promoter of Indian independence and cultural self-assertion.

Max Mueller Bhavan, Chennai, entrusted Ludwig Pesch, a German who has spent years learning and studying Carnatic music, with the task of planning a befitting programme of tribute in Chennai in the wider context of a major German festival under way in India. Hundreds of German artists and scholars are presently touring India but Pesch was to help mount a celebration of a different kind- primarily with and for South Indian participants.

Dr. Eleonore Rahimi (Institutsleiterin, Max Mueller Bhavan Chennai) & Ludwig Pesch

Ludwig Pesch felt that this presented him with an opportunity to highlight the manner in which Max Mueller would have wanted the manifestations and contributions of other civilizations to be recognised, and to explore cultural achievements connecting people from different periods and places. In the event, he sought and secured the cooperation of several renowned performers and scholars, and the students of Brhaddhvani, to be Max Mueller’s guides on ‘a cultural tour’ of South India.

The celebrations began with an invocation and ended with a Musical Journey, both presented by Brhaddhvani’s students.

The morning and afternoon sessions organised at the Max Mueller Bhavan consisted of lecture demonstrations by the artists of four public programmes held at the MMB and at the Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan auditorium.

There were also lectures and lecdems by several eminent scholars in accordance with their chosen fields of specialisation: Dr. K.V. Ramesh (Patronage in South Indian Performing Arts: Evidence from Epigraphical Records); Dr. Premeela Gurumurthy (Harikatha Kalakshepam: A popular multicultural art in the 19th and early 20th centuries); Nirmala Paniker with her daughter and disciple, Kapila (Mohini Attam: About the research conducted at Natanakairali); P. Nanda Kumar (Dance music in Kerala: edakka with mizhavu players of the Natanakairali ensemble); Dr. Prema Nandakumar (References to South Indian Performing arts in early literature); Dr. V.V. Srivatsa (Language in Indian Art); Vidya Shankar (Sanskrit and Music); Rajkumar Bharathi (Bharatiyar’s contribution to the South Indian music repertoire); T.R. Sundaresan with Pakala Ramdas (The beauty of Yati patterns); S. Rajam with disciples and T.R. Sundaresan (Max Mueller’s great musical contemporaries in different parts of South India: Parameswara Bhagavatar, Patnam Subramania Iyer, Ponniah Pillai, Vedanayakam Pillai, and Poochi Srinivasa Iyengar).

Considering that theatre was the original performing art which also comprised dance and music to varying degrees, the first day was entirely devoted to theatre and Harikatha. The second was devoted to dance, and the third to music to reflect the evolution of these arts in their own right.

G. Venu, Founder-Director, Natanakairali (Irinjalakuda) gave the opening lecture-demonstration titled ‘Koodiyattam, the Sanskrit theatre of Kerala: Research, training and presentation in the tradition of Guru Ammannur Madhava Chakyar’. The story of this small, but famous cultural centre is fascinating and unique in having quietly worked with minimum resources, but successfully so, for the revival of Kerala’s traditional performance traditions over a period of 25 years, this being the silver jubilee.

Source: HOMAGE TO MAX MUELLER IN CHENNAI: PRESENTATIONS OF MUSIC, DANCE & DRAMA
Sruti, India’s premier music and dance magazine – Issue 197, February 2001
https://www.sruti.com/febmar01/febn&n2.html17.10.2001

Learn more: Max Mueller (Wikipedia) >>

Integrated Music Education – Challenges of Teaching and Teacher Training

“Thinking and learning in South Indian Music” by Ludwig Pesch, chapter 4 in: Markus Cslovjecsek, Madeleine Zulauf (eds.)
Integrated Music Education – Challenges of Teaching and Teacher Training
Peter Lang Publishers, Bern, 2018. 418 pp., 29 fig. b/w, 2 tables
MOUSIKÆ PAIDEIA Music and Education/Musik und Bildung/Musique et Pédagogie. Vol. 1 pb. ISBN 978-3-0343-0388-0

Contents & contributors

Starting point. The school’s disciplinary learning scaffold : a challenge for integrated education / Rudolf Künzli ; The intertwining of music, education, and integration / Madeleine Zulauf & Markus Cslovjecsek
Step 1. Approaching integrated music education by exploring distant horizons. Integrating arts performance and education in communities of practice : a Brazilian experience / Joan Russell ; Thinking and learning in South Indian music / Ludwig Pesch ; Making connections : avant-garde visual artists and Varèse / Colleen Richardson
Step 2. Encountering integrated music education: where school meets life. Cooperative learning in music : music education and the psychology of integration / Frits Evelein ; Music/arts/language interdisciplinary intervention : cultural, linguistic, and artistic development in Francophone minority communities / Anne Lowe & Monique Richard ; Promoting spirituality through music in the classroom / Diana Harris
Step 3. Uncovering school models in integrated music education. Interdisciplinarity based on a deep understanding of disciplinarity : benefits for students’ self-development / Dagmar Widorski ; Considering frameworks for integrating music and the arts / Kari Veblen; Cross-curricular approaches in music teaching / Jonathan Barnes
Step 4. Becoming familiar with integrated music education activities in the classroom. Activities which use and unveil cultural artifacts / Smaragda Chrysostomou, Colleen Richardson & Joan Russell ; Activities which explore links between music and one other subject / Markus Cslovjecsek, Ludwig Pesch & Joan Russell ; Activities which develop from the learners’ presence / Anke Böttcher, Frits Evelein & Diana Harris
Step 5. Being invited into the minds of people engaged in integrated music education. Conceptions of integrated music education : models in dialogue / Madeleine Zulauf & Peter Gentinetta ; When teachers meet specialists : retrospect on the symposium ‘Practice and research in integrated music education’ as a form of professional development / Hermann Gelzer & Helmut Messner

Find a library copy on Worldcat.org >>

This book was presented  during the 33rd ISME World Conference for Music Education (isme2018.org) on Wednesday 18 July 2018.

About this book

Schools are generally oriented towards discipline-based programmes and therefore students often accumulate fragmented knowledge, disconnected from real life concerns. The eighteen contributors to this work suggest that music offers a highway to developing a more appropriate integrated education. They present a range of views on Integrated Music Education rooted in various cultural traditions, based on several interdisciplinary models and integrated arts curricula, inspired by psychological concepts and referenced to recent teaching experiments as well as original research.

In this innovative book, the reader is invited to go beyond the dichotomy between ‘education in music’ and ‘education through music’, exploring the opportunities put forward by Integrated Music Education thanks to a constant movement from the theoretical roots through a precise description of teaching activities to the benefits for students in terms of integration of knowledge, personal development, and social and cultural belonging. Lastly, there are some new and interesting ideas for training teachers.

Art: Arun VC (Wayanad, Kerala)
Illustration from
Vaitari: A musical picture book from Kerala
Audio file: Lakshmi and Marma talas combined in an original rendition by Thrikkamburam Krishnan Marar, a hereditary temple musician in Kerala. Recording location: Natanakairali Irinjalakuda; described in the present publication:
Vaitari: Syllable-based rhythm exercise from Kerala by Ludwig Pesch (pp. 290-4), Ch. “Activities Which Explore Links between Music and One Other Subject”

Worldcat lists compiled by Ludwig Pesch

Yehudi Menuhin over interculturele relaties en synthese

Wederzijdse muzikale beïnvloeding suggereert een bepaalde harmonische richting, die in strijd zou zijn met de strikte wetten van de harmonieleer: een soepele en melodieuze combinatie van zelfstandige stemmen (contrapunt).

De muziek van onze tijd volgt deze wetten niet meer. Maar ook vroeger voelden meester componisten zich maar zelden aan vaste regels gebonden.

[ … ] Er is vast geen betere plek dan Israël om de onderlinge relaties tussen oosterse en westerse culturen te verkennen. Want daar komen drie krachtige stromingen bij elkaar: etnische groepen afkomstig uit Afrika, Azië en Europa. Ze geven een indruk van complexiteit en aantrekkingskracht, het resultaat van een wisselwerking tussen verschillende modellen. Daarom is dit boek meer dan een wetenschappelijk document, even actueel als boeiend, gebaseerd op eigen ervaring.

Europa heeft zijn wilskracht bijgedragen, en het vermogen om veel te synthetiseren wat zijn oorsprong in Azië heeft: van Mongolië in het noorden tot India in het zuiden, vervolgens in Hongarije verenigd in de muziek van de Magyaren en zigeuners [Sinti en Roma]. 1

[…] De opgave van onze tijd is een genuanceerd beeld van de onderlinge relaties door gebruik te maken van het vermogen waarover alle volkeren en culturen beschikken, namelijk de kracht om te geven en te nemen, van elkaar te leren; want we zullen elkaar altijd nodig hebben. Het vergt wel enige nederigheid om het best mogelijke te bereiken – en het ergste te voorkomen – in tijden van toenemende afhankelijkheid van elkaar. – Yehudi Menuhin (Londen, januari 1977) 2

Vrij vertaald uit: Musik zwischen Orient und Okzident: Eine Kulturgeschichte der Wechselbeziehungen von Peter Gradenwitz S. 390-392 | Details: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1046379134

Yehudi Menuhin - Book cover "Unfinished Journey" thumbnail
Participation in Indian music means much to me – urging in sequences which will never be repeated the savoring of each note; heightening the ear’s perception of the notes, the rhythms and the flexible tensions between them
Yehudi Menuhin in Unfinished Journey (London, 1978, p. 343)
  1. Toelichting voor de niet langer gebruikelijke, want denigrerende term “zigeuner” en de behoefte aan nuance, die pas na de publicatie van dit boek in 1977 tot verandering heeft geleid (hier vrij vertaald zoals volgt):

    “Zigeuner is een stereotiep woord, alleen gebruikt door de meerderheid, maar wordt door de minderheid als discriminerend afgewezen; want deze minderheden noemden zichzelf altijd Sinti en Roma. Dankzij de Duitse burgerrechtenbeweging vanaf de eind jaren zeventig werd een bewustzijn gecreëerd wat vooroordelen en uitsluitingsmechanismen betreft die met het woord “zigeuner” verbonden zijn. [ … ] De termen Sinti en Roma zijn geenszins “politiek correcte” uitvindingen van de burgerrechtenbeweging maar al in documenten uit de 18e eeuw aantoonbaar. [ … ] Dus het woord zigeuner zegt meer over de fantasieën, angsten en verlangens van degenen die het gebruiken dan over het leven van de Sinti en Roma.

    Meer informatie zie: https://zentralrat.sintiundroma.de/sinti-und-roma-zigeuner/
    (Duitse en Engelse bronnen)
    In Nederland ontbreekt het tot nu toe blijkbaar aan een gezamenlijk standpunt over belangenbehartiging van de verschillende gemeenschappen:
    https://www.verwey-jonker.nl/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/318020_Verkennend-onderzoek-naar-centrale-Roma-Sinti_WEB.pdf
    []

  2. “Humility is a quality often associated with self-deprecation. But by championing our achievements while also acknowledging our weaknesses, we could see benefits in many areas of our lives – and even increase our attractiveness.” – Introduction BBC podcast All in theMind (accessed 1 November 2023) []

Flower song from Vaitari: A musical picture book from Kerala

Cover page of "Vaitari - musical picture book from Kerala"

Vaitari, A musical picture book from Kerala
Song for page 13

This colourful book creates opportunities to enjoy making music together without any prior training in Indian music on the parts of teachers and their pupils. “Making music together” means nothing more or less than using half an hour in a constructive manner without lengthy preparations, equipment, or instruments. In our approach, the use of voice and hands are wholly sufficient to participate; and pictures serve to get children involved and motivate them to draw and paint themselves before or after each lessons. But if time is limited to a single session, teachers are offered plenty to choose from and make those shared moments memorable and enjoyable.

More information about Vaitari, A musical picture book from Kerala is found on the project website: www.sam.mimemo.net (English) | Deutsch >>

“Flow” in music for integrated education and lifetime learning

“Just as flow is a prerequisite for mastery in a craft, profession, or art, so too with learning. Students who get into flow as they study do better, quite apart from their potential as measured by achievement tests.” – Daniel Goleman in Emotional Intelligence

Learn more in the context of a free, raga-based exercise that can be taught and practiced anywhere, any time with a modicum of experience and perseverance >>