A Musical Lotus Pond – workshop at ISME 2012 World Conference

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Purpose
Probing the depths of Indian sounds and symbols both for their interdisciplinary potential and intrinsic value.

Content
We pool musical, visual and numerical motifs. Sounds, hand gestures and movements link two school subjects within a single session; and more subjects wherever this approach lends itself to being integrated into a curriculum.

Method
The “Musical Lotus Pond” is a biotope where beauty flourishes in unexpected ways. Each participant embellishes a sheet of paper containing numbers and shapes. These form the basis for musical activities. At the conclusion, the sheets are folded into small cones resembling the “school cones” traditionally used to entice European children to attend school. Children will spontaneously share their experiences with peers and family members.

Application for integrated education
Analytical thinking, self-expression and teamwork are cultivated. For this purpose, motifs derived from Indian music are combined with those belonging to subjects as diverse as visual arts, geography, biology, physical education and maths.

Pure maths is a religion and in the East, valued for more than merely its technical applicationNovalis (1799)

Background information
Indian culture is permeated by synesthetic associations that make learning both enjoyable and (cost) effective. Moreover it fosters concentration and teamwork. It is therefore no coincidence that the ubiquitous lotus motif symbolizes the aspiration to rise above the ordinary and beyond predictability.
The presenters work with the motto “Adapting Indian Universals in Music Education” (AIUME); and this in response to the needs of children and music students. Contributions to exhibitions (e.g. Museum Rietberg Zürich and Royal Tropical Museum Amsterdam) complement their artistic and scholarly pursuits: one is a singer, composer and multi-instrumentalist; the other trained and performed as flautist in India, and authored The Oxford Illustrated Companion to South Indian Classical Music.

I surely know the hundred petals of a lotus will not remain closed for ever and the secret recess of its honey will be bared. – from Gitanjali by Nobel Awardee Rabindranath Tagore

Listen to Tagore: Unlocking Cages: Sunil Khilnani tells the story of the Bengali writer and thinker Rabindranath Tagore: https://bbc.in/1KVh4Cf >>
The acclaimed BBC 4 podcast series titled Incarnations: India in 50 Lives has also been published in book form (Allen Lane).

“I was moved by how many of these lives pose challenges to the Indian present,” he writes, “and remind us of future possibilities that are in danger of being closed off.” – Sunil Khilnani quoted in a review by William Dalrymple in The Guardian (14 March 2016)

Rhythmes Carnatiques – Workshop au Conservatoire de Bobigny

Workshop in collaboration with Patrick Villanueva. Conservatoire Jean Wiener in Bobigny (Paris)

Organisé par Patrick Villanueva pour les étudiants du jazz (24 octobre 2011)

dear Ludwig, again thank you for your presentation. Everybody liked it and I appreciated your effort of doing it in french. Above all, your insistance on playing and expressiveness brought freshness to the difficulties of indian rhythms, and what came after you (claves and body percussion)! I also enjoyed very much exchanging challenging ideas about education … Patrick Villanueva

Livre-CD ‘Musique d’Inde du Sud – Petit traité de musique carnatique’

Livre-CD en Français (2001) recommendé par Ludwig Pesch

Cet essai éclaire les traditions millénaires de la musique classique de l’Inde de Sud, transmise le long d’une chaîne orale continue de maître à disciple. L’auteur nous plonge dans les arcanes du raga et des émotions qu’il suscite et développe les clés des concordances symboliques et de l’apprentissage de cette musique carnatique considérée comme une voie spirituelle pour atteindre la libération du moi individuel et son union à l’universel.
Le CD tente de reconstituer les différentes phases d’un concert de musique carnatique avec notamment la voix d’Aruna Sayeeram et le violoniste T.N. Krishnan.
Un extrait du titre n° 6 est disponible à l’écoute.

Les titres du CD
1. Varnam : Om pranava ; Raga : Mayamalavagaula ; tala : adi (Aruna Sayeeram : chant) : 5’36
2. Kriti : Marivere gati ; Raga : Anandabhairavi ; tala : misra chappu (T.N. Krishnan : violon) : 14’15
3. Kriti : Vallabha nayakasya ; Raga : Begada ; tala : rupakam (Dr Semmangudi R. Srinivasa Iyer : chant ; L. Subramaniam : violon) : 8’01
4. Raga : Alapana ; Raga : Kamboji (T.R. Mahalingam : flûte ; L. Subramaniam : violon) : 3’05
5. Kriti : Raga ratna malikace ; Raga : Ritigaula ; tala : rupakam (V. Doreswamy Iyengar : vina) : 15’50
6. Alapana et kriti : Marakata mani ; Raga : Varali ; tala : adi (D.K. Pattammal : chant) : 9’28
7. Padam : Ninnu juchi ; Raga : Punnagavarali ; tala : tisra triputa (Aruna Sayeeram : chant) : 9’28
8. Tillana ; Raga : kapi ; tala : lakshmsam (Trivandrum R.S. Mani : chant) : 2’02

Enseignante de formation, Isabelle Clinquart a vécu pendant dix ans au Kerala, où elle a appris la danse et le chant de théâtre kathakali, ainsi que la musique carnatique. Elle a donné ses premiers concerts en 1997 et s’est produite régulièrement au Kerala tout en poursuivant son apprentissage.

21,00 € disponible
Collection : musiques du monde
179 pages
Illustrations 35 N&B
14 x 18 / Livre-CD broché / 2001 2-7427-3324-8

Source: Librairie en ligne – Cité de la musique
Address : http://www.cite-musique.fr/boutique/article.aspx?a=890
Date Visited: Wed Nov 02 2011 09:45:10 GMT+0100 (CET)

Ladders to Heaven (Leiterli-Spiel) des Museum Rietberg Zürich für iPhone & iPad Spiel

Rietberg_Leiterli_icon_ApngLadders to Heaven
Dieses iPad/iPhone* Game ist eine Neuinterpretation des indischen Brettspiels «Snakes and Ladders». Die Ästhetik und Musik des Spiels beruhen auf altindischer Malerei und indischen Rhythmen. Jetzt gratis herunterladen im AppStore!

Ein Besuch der Ausstellungen des Museum Rietberg in Zürich lohnt sich!

* kompatibel mit den neuen Modellen des iPod touch

+ Museum Rietberg >>

Manickam Yogeswaran – reviews

“A singer in the Indian classical tradition, a great improviser and someone who brings a completely different approach to intonation.” – SINGER MAGAZINE

“The contemporary feel of the music is a result of the catchy harmonies and melodies melding perfectly with the historical roots and Tamil musicianship. … Astounding!” – Matthew Forss –insideworldmusic.blogspot.com

“Laced with haunting Tamil vocals by British-based musician Manickam Yogeswaran … shaping its emotional crescendo.” – FILM SCORE DAILY (“25th hour” filmscore by Terence Blanchard)

“skilful modulation … soft and malleable voice” – THE HINDU

“For Yogeswaran’s flight of imagination there was only his own piece, a South Indian Ave Maria …  a high point.” (The Shout Christmas Show) – THE GUARDIAN

”Yoga’s vocal technique comfortably manages a range of pitch, intensity, volume and speed … designed to carry words of peace, love and devotion. – (CD review “Peace for Paradise”) Matthew Shorter – GLOBAL MUSIC CULTURE

Yogeswaran’s music is steeped in the Temple traditions of South India.

He is a disciple of Padmabushan Sangitha Kalanidhi Sri T V Gopalakrishnan.

Yogeswaran performs worldwide: from traditional “Carnatic” formats (accompanied by violin, mirdangam, kanjira and tambura) to orchestras just as in musicals and in the context of Western contemporary music.

As noted by Indian and Western reviewers, his concerts are marked by a rear blend of creativity, virtuosity and high emotive quality.

He was the first ever Tamil voice in Hollywood.

More on https://www.facebook.com/manickam.yogeswaran >>

Carnatic music workshops for all

Lotuspond_Workshop_Participants_IMG_5214

Melodious music and captivating rhythms in which to get immersed; joyfully and immediately; with self-confidence yet always together even without having any previous experience.

Site-specific workshops can be arranged and conducted in English, German, Dutch and French.

Testimonials >>

For further inquiries, please send us an email >>

Peace For Paradise – CD Review by Matthew Forss

CD Review: Yogeswaran Manickam’s ‘Peace For Paradise’

Peace For Paradise | Fuego Wednesday, July 13, 2011

The Sri Lankan-born, U.K.-based musician incorporates peaceful melodies and Indian classicism with historical, poetic works and a modern instrument repertoire. A mix of Tamil and English lyric songs include the sitar, darabuka, oud, accordion, guitar, violin, flute, and various percussion and keyboard arrangements. The contemporary feel of the music is a result of the catchy harmonies and melodies melding perfectly with the historical roots and Tamil musicianship. As a film composer, Yoga M. has gained exposure creating pop, dance, new age, and global rhythms that sound majestic and infectious. The ten songs represent a solid mix of talented musicians, instruments, and contemporary arrangements without the typical raga or snake charmer stereotype designations. In particular, the music is fresh, emotive, and a blessing to listen to. Anyone with an interest in Indian/South Asian global musicians should definitely check it out. The most comparable group could be a fictional meeting of Tulku and Trilok Gurtu. Astounding! ~ Matthew Forss

Yogeswaran’s music is steeped in the Temple traditions of South India.

He is a disciple of Padmabushan Sangitha Kalanidhi Sri T V Gopalakrishnan.

Yogeswaran performs worldwide: from traditional “Carnatic” formats (accompanied by violin, mirdangam, kanjira and tambura) to orchestras just as in musicals and in the context of Western contemporary music.

As noted by Indian and Western reviewers, his concerts are marked by a rear blend of creativity, virtuosity and high emotive quality.

He was the first ever Tamil voice in Hollywood.

More on https://www.facebook.com/manickam.yogeswaran >>

In true music there is no place for communal differences and hostility. True music is created only when life is attuned to a single tune and a single time beat. Music is born only where the strings of the heart are not out of tune.

Mahatma Gandhi – A unique musician” by Namrata Mishra >>